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Instructions

Get to know your new carrier

SNAP CARRIER

Front Inward Carry 

Back Carry

Hip Carry - Starting from Front Inward Carry 

Wearing tips in your Snap Carrier 

Breastfeeding in your Snap Carrier

  • Newborns only to be carried when using an insert or similar
  • This Carrier is NOT designed to wear your baby in a front forward facing position.

Final Checks: 

SECURING THE WAISTBAND


You will need to ensure the waistband straps have been pulled tightly and are firmly secure, you should barely be able to fit a finger between your body and the waistband - this will create the foundation for your baby to be properly supported.


Ensure that the carrier is secured around your natural waist, this is advisable for all carry positions. Any lower and it will compromise the overall safety and comfort of the carrier.

Finding your natural waist is simply the space between the top of your hip bone and the base of your rib cage - this goes for both men and women

WHEN CAN MY BABY START USING THE SNAP


Knowing exactly when your baby is ready to use the snap carrier can be hard to determine without actually trying him in the carrier first.

Although the beginning weight limit is 5.5kgs, the best guide to go by is age of around 3-4 months.


What you are looking for is full knee to knee support.

You never want the carrier panel to go beyond your baby's knees forcing them to overextend into the air. There should be a natural bend at your baby's knee.

POSITIONING THE SHOULDER STRAPS


Once the carrier is secure, you will want to ensure the straps sit wide on your shoulders. Never allow the straps to rest on your neck as this will become uncomfortable quite quickly.


Always make sure you have tightened each strap evenly - you will know if you need to make any adjustments simply by the way the carrier feels, however you can double check by looking at the back straps in the mirror. If the X meets at the same place, then you are set to go.

TIGHTENING THE STRAPS 


When you are tightening the straps, always be sure to pull the slack out of the straps and not from the front of the carrier.  This can pull bubs back into an curve and can also wear down the fabric underneath the buckles.  


To do this, can you help lift bub up under her bum to loosen the extra slack in the straps and then adjust at the buckle.  

PELVIC TUCK 


A very simple tuck of the pelvis helps to curve baby's back into it's naturally rounded position and lifts the knees up higher than the bottom so the hips are in the hip healthy 'M' position.


Gently hold your baby's thighs in your hands.  With a big scooping action, gently assist your baby's pelvis in tucking under and up towards you.  This video from Brooke Maree is very helpful.

WRAP CARRIER 

Newborn Carry 

Suitable from birth until 4-6 weeks or when your baby shows signs of discomfort. Always ensure your baby is NOT sitting on their feet.

Front Inward Carry - using elastic cinch

Suitable from birth until your babies knees extend beyond the seat panel.


Newborn & Small Baby wearing tips 

A few tips and tricks to get the perfect carry 


Front Inward Carry - no cinch 

From 6-8 months or when the carrier can reach from knee to knee allowing a natural bend at your babies knee 

Hip Carry 

Use this carry for babies you would naturally carry on your hip, usually around 5-6 months. (can also be done using the cinch if needed)

Back Carry

Suitable once your baby is sitting unassisted, usually around 6-8 months. Find someone to help you the first few times.


Final Checks

FOLDING THE WAISTBAND


Fold the waistband so that the panel is the perfect height for your baby. Typically for a newborn this is 2 folds.

Ensure you fold the waistband, and not roll it. Each fold needs to maintain the width of the actual waistband.

FOLDING THE WAISTBAND


Fold the waistband so that the panel is the perfect height for your baby. Typically for a newborn this is 2 folds.

Ensure you fold the waistband, and not roll it. Each fold needs to maintain the width of the actual waistband.

SECURING THE WAISTBAND


You will need to ensure the waistband straps have been pulled tightly and are firmly secure, you should barely be able to fit a finger between your body and the waistband - this will create the foundation for your babe to be properly supported.


For newborn babies secure the waistband slightly higher than your natural waist. For bigger babies and toddlers secure at your natural waist, this is advisable for all carry positions.

NEWBORN POSITIONING


The "M" seat is the safest and most comfortable position for your baby.

For a newborn carry, you will need to ensure their bum sits low and their knees are bent over their ankles with their squat spread against your body.


If you are carrying with their little legs inside the carrier, you will need to ensure they are not sitting on their feet. This is important to maintain proper circulation.

NEWBORN POSITIONING


The "M" seat is the safest and most comfortable position for your baby.

For a newborn carry, you will need to ensure their bum sits low and their knees are bent over their ankles with their squat spread against your body.


If you are carrying with their little legs inside the carrier, you will need to ensure they are not sitting on their feet. This is important to maintain proper circulation.

USING THE CINCH 


The "M" seat is still just as important as your child grows. When you are ready to transition your baby to carry with their little legs out of the carrier - you will need to use the elastic cinch at the side of the panel to narrow the seat width.  This will ensure the seat width is narrow enough to support your babies hips and will provide optimum knee to knee support.


Using the elastic cinch is very straight forward - simply pass the entire body panel and straps through this loop. Once through, ensure the elastic sits at the same level on the opposite side. Now pull through any excess trapped fabric and smooth evenly.

USING THE CINCH 


The "M" seat is still just as important as your child grows. When you are ready to transition your baby to carry with their little legs out of the carrier - you will need to use the elastic cinch at the side of the panel to narrow the seat width.  This will ensure the seat width is narrow enough to support your babies hips and will provide optimum knee to knee support.


Using the elastic cinch is very straight forward - simply pass the entire body panel and straps through this loop. Once through, ensure the elastic sits at the same level on the opposite side. Now pull through any excess trapped fabric and smooth evenly.

STRAP PLACEMENT


Always ensure the straps are smooth flat and not rolled, you do not want any bulky fabric areas digging into you or your bub. This can be helped by taking the straps by the top rail instead of grabbing the whole strap in a bunch when securing.


TIP: A gentle iron of the straps every so often will help smooth out any deep creases.

For small babies, simply crossing the straps widely across their body is all that is needed.


As they grow and start getting a little more wriggly, twisting the straps (as shown ) can add extra support to ensure your firm tie stays in place. 

STRAP PLACEMENT


Always ensure the straps are smooth flat and not rolled, you do not want any bulky fabric areas digging into you or your bub. This can be helped by taking the straps by the top rail instead of grabbing the whole strap in a bunch when securing.


TIP: A gentle iron of the straps every so often will help smooth out any deep creases.

For small babies, simply crossing the straps widely across their body is all that is needed.


As they grow and start getting a little more wriggly, twisting the straps (as shown ) can add extra support to ensure your firm tie stays in place. 

POSITIONING THE SHOULDER STRAPS


Once the carrier is secure, you will want to ensure the straps sit wide on your shoulders. Never allow the straps to rest on your neck as this will become uncomfortable quite quickly.


For additional support use the excess fabric at the shoulders to pull down onto your upper arms.

PELVIC TUCK 


A very simple tuck of the pelvis helps to curve baby's back into it's naturally rounded position and lifts the knees up higher than the bottom so the hips are in the hip healthy 'M' position.


Gently hold your baby's thighs in your hands.  With a big scooping action, gently assist your baby's pelvis in tucking under and up towards you.  This video from Brooke Maree is very helpful.

INFANT INSERT 

Newborn Carry 

Suitable from birth until 4-6 weeks or when your baby shows signs of discomfort. Always ensure your baby is NOT sitting on their feet.

VIDEO COMING SOON 

HEAD PLACEMENT 


Make sure your baby is sitting close enough to kiss, that their airways are open and clear. Newborns and sleeping babies should always have their heads positioned to the side

FOOT PLACEMENT 


Your baby's feet and legs should be sitting outside of the insert.  Ensure there is no strain placed on his feet and they do no tuck under the insert.  


THINGS TO NOTE: 

  • Back Carry position is for children 6+ months who can sit unassisted with strong head and upper body control.


  • When wearing a child on your back, frequently look at yourself when passing a window or another reflective object. Or ideally have someone check for you.


  • Front Outward Facing Carry position is only for children who can hold his or her own head upright. Not recommended for babies under 4 months.


  • The seat panel must reach to the knee and not beyond. If the panel extends beyond the knee, this will indicate adjustments need to be made using the seat panel cinch to further narrow the seat panel.


  • For all babies, but especially infants under 4 months, remember to always keep the face uncovered and visible.


  • When carrying babies under 4 months, position their heads to one side and monitor breathing. Grunting may indicate breathing distress and should be removed from the carrier.


  • ​Please check your carrier regularly for any damage that may affect the quality and safety.